Sunday, 26 January 2014

Foods That Stain Your Teeth: Tea and Your Teeth


Although tea has a reputation as a healthy beverage, it may not be the best choice when it comes to keeping your teeth white. Dentists say tea -- especially the basic black variety -- can cause more stains than coffee. However, recent studies have found that even herbal teas and white teas have the potential to erode enamel and cause tooth staining.

Above article from: Webmd.com/oral-health


Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com

Tuesday, 21 January 2014

Say Goodbye to “Cavity Bugs!”

Our mouths and teeth are full of germs.  Some of these germs are good, some are neutral, but one in particular is bad and causes tooth decay.  Streptococcus mutans (I’ll call them “cavity bugs”) sticks to our teeth and eats the same foods we eat.  These “cavity bugs” then produce acid onto the tooth surface which causes tooth decay.

Xylitol is an alternative, natural sweetener extracted from plants and also found in the human body. Some brands of gums, candies, mints, toothpastes, and mouthrinses are sweetened with xylitol.  When we put these products into our mouths, the “cavity bugs” eat the xylitol.  Now here’s the cool part…the xylitol clogs up the receptors on the surface of these germs, so they can’t eat sugar and make acid to cause the cavities.  The “cavity bugs” also can’t produce the slimy “glue” that they use to stick themselves to the tooth, so they fall off the tooth and are more easily removed by toothbrushing and flossing.  If a person uses the xylitol often enough and for a long enough period of time, the population of “cavity bugs” plummets way, way down, and other “bugs” move in and take their place, but these other “bugs” don’t cause tooth decay!

Many research studies have demonstrated a HUGE reduction in cavities in both children and adults using xylitol products daily for a long period of time. These studies show that using xylitol products at least 4 or 5 times each day (consuming between 4 and 12 grams of xylitol over the course of a day) will provide the most effective protection against tooth decay.  How can you best benefit from the cavity-fighting properties of xylitol?

  1. Use xylitol toothpaste and/or mouthrinse twice a day, preferably upon waking and at bedtime.
  2. Chew 2 pieces of xylitol gum after each meal.  You only need to chew the gum for 5 minutes to release the xylitol into your saliva.
  3. Use xylitol mints and candies several times during the day to freshen your breath, relieve dry mouth, and give yourself a taste treat.
  4. Xylitol sweetener can be purchased in powder form and used to sweeten beverages, such as coffee, tea, or unsweetened drink mixes (Kool Aid for instance.)  It can also be used in cooking.

Be careful not to overdo it, extremely higher amounts of xylitol, more than 20 grams per meal or 60 grams per day, may cause diarrhea.  And keep it away from your pets, its poisonous for them.

Xylitol products are available locally at the Better Health Store in Plymouth, Zerbo’s in Livonia, also at many drug stores and Walmart. For more information about xylitol, or to purchase xylitol products online, check out some of these resources:

Finally, limit the amount and frequency of sugary snacks and beverages, and brush and floss twice daily! 

Douglas A. Callow, DDS
www.callowdds.com

Wednesday, 8 January 2014

Tooth Decay and Sensitivity

What Causes Tooth Enamel Damage?

What happens when tooth enamel is damaged? The exposed part underneath becomes vulnerable to decay. Cavities aren't the only problem.

Teeth with damaged enamel can become sensitive to extreme temperatures. Suddenly, eating ice cream or sipping hot coffee can be painful or unpleasant.

Above article from: WebMD.com/oral-health


Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com

Wednesday, 1 January 2014

How Enamel Protects Your Teeth

What Causes Tooth Enamel Damage?

Enamel is kind of like the shell of an egg: it protects the softer, more vulnerable part of the tooth inside.
But unlike an eggshell, the thin layer of enamel is tough.

In fact, enamel is the hardest substance in the body. It can withstand decades of biting, chewing and crunching -- with some luck and good dental care.

Above article from: WebMD.com/oral-health


Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com