Thursday, 26 June 2014

What is Plaque?

Plaque is a sticky, colorless deposit of bacteria that is constantly forming on the tooth surface. Saliva, food and fluids combine to produce these deposits that collect where the teeth and gums meet. Plaque buildup is the primary factor in periodontal (gum) disease, including gingivitis.

How to Get Rid of Plaque
To help prevent plaque buildup, be sure to brush your teeth at least twice a day with an anti-plaque toothpaste such as Crest Pro-Health Toothpaste for around the clock protection against plaque buildup, and floss once a day.

Adding a mouth rinse such as Crest Pro-Health Multi-Protection Rinse to your routine can help against plaque buildup, without the burning sensation of alcohol. Eating well-balanced meals and brushing after snacks will reduce the formation of plaque. Visit your dental office regularly for oral exams and cleanings, during which your dental professional will scrape away any accumulated plaque with a special instrument.

Above article from: Crest.com


Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com
 

Thursday, 19 June 2014

Tartar

Tartar is a deposit that forms when plaque hardens on the tooth. Individuals vary greatly in their susceptibility to tartar buildup. For many, these deposits build up faster with age. Tartar is easily noticeable because of its yellow or brown color on teeth.

What Causes Tartar Buildup
When plaque accumulates and is not removed from teeth, it can harden and turn into tartar. Because tartar buildup bonds strongly to enamel, it can only be removed by a dental professional.

Help Prevent Tartar Buildup
While tartar can only be removed by a dental professional, you can avoid tartar buildup by removing plaque. To help prevent tartar, be sure to brush your teeth at least twice daily, preferably with a tartar-control fluoride toothpaste like many from Crest, and floss once a day with a product like GlideƆ. And visit your dental office regularly for oral exams and cleanings.

Above article from: Crest.com


Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com
 


Tuesday, 3 June 2014

What are the Stages of Gum Disease?

What is Gum Disease?
Gum disease is an inflammation of the gums that can progress to affect the bone that surrounds and supports your teeth. It is caused by the bacteria in plaque, a sticky, colorless film that constantly forms on your teeth. If not removed through daily brushing and flossing, plaque can build up and the bacteria infect not only your gums and teeth, but eventually the gum tissue and bone that support the teeth. This can cause them to become loose, fall out or have to be removed by a dentist.
There are three stages of gum disease:

  • Gingivitis: this is the earliest stage of gum disease, an inflammation of the gums caused by plaque buildup at the gumline. If daily brushing and flossing do not remove the plaque, it produces toxins (poisons) that can irritate the gum tissue, causing gingivitis. You may notice some bleeding during brushing and flossing. At this early stage in gum disease, damage can be reversed, since the bone and connective tissue that hold the teeth in place are not yet affected.
  • Periodontitis: at this stage, the supporting bone and fibers that hold your teeth in place are irreversibly damaged. Your gums may begin to form a pocket below the gumline, which traps food and plaque. Proper dental treatment and improved home care can usually help prevent further damage.
  • Advanced Periodontitis: in this final stage of gum disease, the fibers and bone supporting your teeth are destroyed, which can cause your teeth to shift or loosen. This can affect your bite and, if aggressive treatment can't save them, teeth may need to be removed.

Read the rest of the article at Colgate.com to learn more about how to know if you have gum disease and how gum disease is treated.


 












 
















The above article is from: Colgate.com

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com