Wednesday, 30 December 2015

7 Easy Tips for White and Healthy Teeth

Who isn't on the quest to acquire the perfect set of teeth?

It was Hippocrates and Aristotle who wrote about repairing decaying teeth and fractured jaws centuries ago, and today, cosmetic bonding and cosmetic dentistry are all the rage. Many of us looking for the perfect smile will waste no time in thronging their dentist's office with such requests.

Having a great set of pearly whites can boost your self-confidence like few other things can. However, keeping your teeth in great shape will require you to put in a little time and effort on an everyday basis.

The daily brushing-and-flossing routine is a must for maintaining dental hygiene. Additionally, making sure that you stick to the following oral-hygiene tips and tricks will help you protect and care for your teeth better.

1. Keep Stains Away

Can't keep away from your cup of black coffee, but want to avoid those ghastly stains on your teeth? The good news is that you can lighten and remove most teeth stains.

With technological advancements, several teeth-whitening procedures have been developed that can treat tooth discoloration effectively. While most are performed at the dentist's, taking a few precautionary measures yourself can help you avoid these stains all together.

Sip your dark-colored soda, red wine, and coffee with a straw in small quantities, instead of drinking them from a glass/mug as doing so can ensure that your teeth never stain.

2. Keep Your Teeth Naturally Clean and Strong

Woke up late and rushing to work? Seems like flossing isn't going to be possible today? No worries! Munch on fibrous fruits and veggies like apples and lettuce for breakfast. Fiber prevents the buildup of tartar and plaque on your teeth, thus making them appear cleaner.

Fibrous foods also serve as exfoliating agents and prevent stain molecules from attaching themselves to teeth. Also, because these crunchy foods require a lot of chewing, they keep your teeth and gums strong and healthy.

To read the entire article written by Lawrence Calagna, please visit WebDental.com

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Lifestyle and Oral Health

Learn what the American Dental Association has to say about lifestyle and oral health.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Wednesday, 23 December 2015

Bioactive Glass Leads to Longer-Lasting Fillings

Dentists complete 122 million composite tooth restorations in the United States each year, according to Oregon State University (OSU). But the average lifetime of posterior dental composites is only 6 years. Bioactive glass may improve their durability and provide some of the minerals that have been lost to tooth decay.

“Bioactive glass, which is a type of crushed glass that is able to interact with the body, has been used in some types of bone healing for decades,” said Jamie Kruzic, a professor at the OSU college of engineering. The hard and stiff material can replace the inert glass fillers now mixed with polymers to make modern composite tooth fillings.

“This type of glass is only beginning to see use in dentistry, and our research shows it may be very promising for tooth fillings,” he said. “The bacteria in the mouth that help cause cavities don’t seem to like this type of glass and are less likely to colonize on fillings that incorporate it. This could have a significant impact on the future of dentistry.”

Bioactive glass is made with compounds such as silicon oxide, calcium oxide, and phosphorous oxide, and it looks like powdered glass. Its antimicrobial effect is attributed, in part, to the release of ions such as those from calcium and phosphate that have a toxic effect on oral bacteria and tend to neutralize the local acidic environment.

“Almost all fillings will eventually fail,” Kruzic said. “New tooth decay often begins at the interface of a filling and the tooth and is called secondary tooth decay. The tooth is literally being eroded and demineralized at that surface.” 

To read the entire article, please visit DentistryToday.com

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Your Smile is Important

Learn what the American Dental Association has to say about why your smile is important.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Wednesday, 16 December 2015

Understanding Your Dental Plan

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to about understanding your dental plan.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Sunday, 6 December 2015

Chew on this: Six dental myths debunked

Myth 1: The consequences of poor oral health are restricted to the mouth

Expectant mothers may not know that what they eat affects the tooth development of the fetus. Poor nutrition during pregnancy may make the unborn child more likely to have tooth decay later in life. “Between the ages of 14 weeks to four months, deficiencies in calcium, vitamin D, vitamin A, protein and calories could result in oral defects,” says Carole Palmer, EdD, RD, professor at TUSDM and head of the division of nutrition and oral health promotion in the department of public health and community service. Some data also suggest that lack of adequate vitamin B6 or B12 could be a risk factor for cleft lip and cleft palate formation.

In children, tooth decay is the most prevalent disease, about five times more common than childhood asthma. “If a child’s mouth hurts due to tooth decay, he/she is less likely to be able to concentrate at school and is more likely to be eating foods that are easier to chew but that are less nutritious. Foods such as donuts and pastries are often lower in nutritional quality and higher in sugar content than more nutritious foods that require chewing, like fruits and vegetables,” says Palmer. “Oral complications combined with poor diet can also contribute to cognitive and growth problems and can contribute to obesity.”

Myth 2: More sugar means more tooth decay

It isn’t the amount of sugar you eat; it is the amount of time that the sugar has contact with the teeth. “Foods such as slowly-dissolving candies and soda are in the mouth for longer periods of time. This increases the amount of time teeth are exposed to the acids formed by oral bacteria from the sugars,” says Palmer.

Some research shows that teens obtain about 40 percent of their carbohydrate intake from soft drinks. This constant beverage use increases the risk of tooth decay. Sugar-free carbonated drinks and acidic beverages, such as lemonade, are often considered safer for teeth than sugared beverages but can also contribute to demineralization of tooth enamel if consumed regularly.

To read the entire article written by Medardo Chua, please visit IDentalAccess.com


Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Tuesday, 1 December 2015

Tobacco Risks on Oral Health

Learn what the American Dental Association has to say about tobacco risks on oral health.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com