Saturday, 24 June 2017

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'What Kind of Toothpaste Should I Use?'

The American Dental Association has created informative videos called Ask the Dentist. Here is their video on: 'What Kind of Toothpaste Should I Use?'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Saturday, 17 June 2017

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'My Child Has a Toothache. Should I Call the Dentist?'

The American Dental Association has created informative videos called Ask the Dentist. Here is their video on: 'My Child Has a Toothache. Should I Call the Dentist?'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Wednesday, 7 June 2017

Potential Causes of Toothaches: It's Not Always a Cavity

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by Wendy J. Woudstra

No matter how conscientious you are about your oral care routine, at some point in your life you will probably experience the discomfort of a toothache. Though a cavity is the most likely culprit, it is only one of several possible causes of toothaches.

Tooth Sensitivity
If you are experiencing sharp pains when eating or drinking hot or cold foods, it could mean you have a cavity. It may also be a sign that you may have sensitive teeth, either from receding gums or from a thinning of your tooth enamel. While you are waiting for a dental appointment to confirm the cause of your sensitive teeth, using a soft-bristled toothbrush and a toothpaste designed for sensitive teeth may help ease the symptoms.

Some Toothaches Are More Severe
If the pain you are experiencing is a sharp, stabbing pain when you bite down on your food, the cause of your toothache could be a cavity or a cracked tooth. If it's a throbbing, incessant pain, on the other hand, you may have an abscessed tooth or an infection that should be taken care of as quickly as possible.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • It Might Not Even Be Your Teeth
  • See Your Dentist to Be Sure

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Wednesday, 31 May 2017

Dealing With Dry Mouth

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by the ADA

A healthy adult produces about three pints of saliva each day. It's not the kind of thing you would give thought to very often, but that saliva plays a very important role in maintaining your health.

Saliva serves many purposes. It contains enzymes that aid in digestion. Saliva makes it easier to talk, a fact recognized by those who experience stage fright and the associated dry mouth while giving a presentation. 

Saliva also helps prevent tooth decay by washing away food and debris from the teeth and gums. It neutralizes damaging acids, enhances the ability to taste food and makes it easier to swallow. Minerals found in saliva also help repair microscopic tooth decay. 

Everyone, at some time or another, experiences dry mouth, also called "xerostomia." It can happen when you are nervous, upset or under stress or as a result of medication you take or other medical therapies. If dry mouth happens all or most of the time, however, it can be uncomfortable - and it can have serious consequences for your oral health.

Drying irritates the soft tissues in the mouth, which can make them inflamed and more susceptible to infection. Without the cleansing effects of saliva, tooth decay and other oral health problems become much more common. 

Regular dental checkups are important. At each appointment, report any medications you are taking and other information about your health. An updated health history can help identify a cause for mouth dryness. 

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'How Can I Help My Elderly Parent Brush Her Teeth?'

The American Dental Association has created informative videos called Ask the Dentist. Here is their video on: 'How Can I Help My Elderly Parent Brush Her Teeth?'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Wednesday, 24 May 2017

All About Cavities

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was Reviewed by the Faculty of Columbia University College of Dental Medicine

What's in Your Mouth? 
To understand what happens when your teeth decay, it's helpful to know what's in your mouth naturally. Here are a few of the elements: 

  • Saliva - Your mouth and teeth are constantly bathed in saliva. We never give much thought to our spit, but this fluid is remarkable for what it does to help protect our oral health. Saliva keeps teeth and other parts of your mouth moist and washes away bits of food. Saliva contains minerals that strengthen teeth. It includes buffering agents. They reduce the levels of acid that can decay teeth. Saliva also protects against some viruses and bacteria. 
  • Plaque - Plaque is a soft, gooey substance that sticks to the teeth a bit like jam sticks to a spoon. Like the slime that clings to the bottom of a swimming pool, plaque is a type of biofilm. It contains large numbers of closely packed bacteria, components taken from saliva, and bits of food. Also in the mix are bacterial byproducts and white blood cells. Plaque grows when bacteria attach to the tooth and begin to multiply. Plaque starts forming right after a tooth is cleaned. Within an hour, there's enough to measure. As time goes on, the plaque thickens. Within two to six hours, the plaque teems with bacteria that can cause cavities and periodontal (gum) disease. 
  • Calculus - If left alone long enough, plaque absorbs minerals from saliva. These minerals form crystals and harden into calculus. Then new plaque forms on top of existing calculus. This new layer can also become hard. 
  • Bacteria - We have many types of bacteria in our mouths. Some bacteria are good; they help control destructive bacteria. When it comes to decay, Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli are the bacteria that cause the most damage to teeth. 

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • How Your Teeth Decay
  • Types of Decay
  • Preventing Cavities

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'How Can I Get My Child to Brush Her Teeth?'

The American Dental Association has created informative videos called Ask the Dentist. Here is their video on: 'How Can I Get My Child to Brush Her Teeth?'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Wednesday, 17 May 2017

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'How Should I Clean and Store My Toothbrush?'

The American Dental Association has created informative videos called Ask the Dentist. Here is their video on: 'How Should I Clean and Store My Toothbrush?'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Sunday, 7 May 2017

3 Things All Athletes Should Do for Their Teeth

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

Dentist Dr. Thomas Long has seen firsthand what can happen when “the puck stops here.” In addition to seeing everyday athletes in his private practice, Dr. Long (a former college hockey player himself) is the team dentist for the National Hockey League’s Carolina Hurricanes.

No matter what sport or skill level, Dr. Long says athletes need to take care of their teeth both on and off the field. “Most athletes are careful about what they eat and their workout routine. Part of that routine should include taking care of your mouth and teeth every single day,” he says. "It would be a shame to miss practice or a game because you are in the dentist's office receiving treatment or recovering from a dental surgical procedure.”

Here, Dr. Long shares his playbook for a healthy mouth. 

  • Make a Mouthguard Part of Your Uniform
  • Sideline Sugary Sports Drinks
  • Brush, Floss, Rinse, Repeat

To read the entire article, including more detailed information on the three steps listed in Dr. Long's playbook for a health mouth, please visit MouthHealthy.org.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Monday, 1 May 2017

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'Do Bad Teeth Run In the Family?'

The American Dental Association has created informative videos called Ask the Dentist. Here is their video on: 'Do Bad Teeth Run In the Family?'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Sunday, 30 April 2017

Natural Teeth Whitening: Fact vs. Fiction

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

When it comes to teeth whitening, you may see many different methods featured online and in magazines-from oil pulling to charcoal, and even turmeric. It's no surprise that DIY whitening is top of mind, either. When the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry asked people what they’d most like to improve their smile, the most common response was whiter teeth. 
Healthy smiles come in many shades, though it's tempting to think ingredients in our own kitchens could hold the key to a brighter smile. Still, just because a method is natural doesn’t mean it’s healthy. In fact, DIY whitening can do more harm than good to your teeth. Here’s how:  

Fruits











Fiction:
The approach maintains you can make your teeth whiter and brighter household staples that are naturally acidic (like lemons, oranges, apple cider vinegar), contain digestive enzymes (such as pineapple or mango) and something that is abrasive (like baking soda).
Fact: 
When eaten as usual, fruit is a great choice. However, fruit and vinegar contain acid, and you put your pearly whites at risk when you prolong their contact with your teeth or use them to scrub your teeth because acid can wear away your enamel. Enamel is the thin outer coating of your teeth that protects you from tooth sensitivity and cavities. 

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article reveals fact vs. fiction for the following:

  • Scrubs
  • Spices and Oils
  • Still Interested in Whitening?

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Monday, 24 April 2017

April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month


April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month
Oral cancer can be fatal. But if detected early, it has a fantastic cure rate.
Get your painless oral cancer screening today! Ask your dentist for an oral cancer screening.
It could save your life


Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'Does Your Dentist Know If You Lie About Brushing and Flossing?'

'Does Your Dentist Know If You Lie About Brushing and Flossing? '


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Sunday, 23 April 2017

8 Non-Dairy, Calcium-Rich Foods for Your Teeth

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org 

Caring for your teeth means more than brushing and cleaning between them every day. It also means paying attention to the foods you eat. 

One of the most important nutrients for healthy teeth is calcium. Calcium strengthens the hard outer shell of your tooth called enamel, which is your teeth’s defense against erosion and cavities. To protect your teeth and get the 1,000-2,000 mg daily recommended amount of calcium, many people turn to dairy products like milk, cheese and yogurt. 

If you’re lactose intolerant or need to limit dairy, there are a number of foods that can still give you the calcium you need. Calcium is found naturally in some foods, while others - such as juice, tofu and even waffles - are now fortified with added calcium. 

Here are some non-dairy options from the USDA Food Composition Database to help keep your body and smile strong.

Orange Juice with Added Calcium











Oranges naturally have a bit of calcium, but many varieties of orange juice (already a top source of vitamin C) now come fortified with calcium. For example, frozen orange juice from concentrate with added calcium contains 1514 mg of calcium per cup. That's your daily recommendation in just one glass! Juice, however, can be high in sugar, so drink it in moderation.  If your child drinks juice, make sure to serve the recommended, age-appropriate limits.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article highlights 7 over non-dairy, calcium-rich foods that are good for your teeth:

  • Whey Powder
  • Tofu with Added Calcium
  • Canned Fish
  • Beans
  • Almonds
  • Leafy Green Vegetables
  • Soymilk

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Monday, 17 April 2017

Your Dentist and Hygienist are your First Line of Defense


Your Dentist and Hygienist are your First Line of Defense
Who else ever examines the inside of your mouth this closely?
Oral cancer can be fatal. But if detected early the cure rate is astounding.
Ask your dentist for a painless oral cancer screening today.
It could save your life.


Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'Should I Pull Out My Child’s Loose Tooth?'

The American Dental Association has created informative videos called Ask the Dentist. Here is their video on: 'Should I Pull Out My Childís Loose Tooth?'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Monday, 10 April 2017

Oral Cancer Screening


Oral cancer is a killer. Thousands die from it every year.
Don’t be one of them.
Ask your dentist for a painless oral cancer screening today!
It could save your life.


Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com

Sunday, 9 April 2017

Mouth-Healthy Eating

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was Reviewed by the Faculty of Columbia University College of Dental Medicine

If you want to prevent cavities, how often you eat can be just as important as what you eat. That's because food affects your teeth and mouth long after you swallow. Eating cookies with dinner will do less harm to your teeth than eating them as a separate snack. Of course, overall poor nutrition can contribute to periodontal (gum) disease. It also can have other long-term effects on your mouth. Learning how food affects your oral health is the first step toward mouth-healthy eating.

Immediate Effects of Food

Changes begin in your mouth the minute you start to eat certain foods. Bacteria in your mouth make acids. The acids start the process that can lead to cavities.

How does this happen?
All carbohydrate foods eventually break down into simple sugars: glucose, fructose, maltose and lactose. Fermentable carbohydrates break down in the mouth. Other foods don't break down until they move further down the digestive tract.

Fermentable carbohydrates work with bacteria to form acids that begin the decay process and eventually destroy teeth. They include the obvious sugary foods, such as cookies, cakes, soft drinks and candy. But they also include less obvious foods, such as bread, crackers, bananas and breakfast cereals.

Certain bacteria on your teeth use the sugars from these foods and produce acids. The acids dissolve minerals inside the tooth enamel. The process is called demineralization. Teeth also can regain minerals. This natural process is called remineralization. Saliva helps minerals to build back up in teeth. So do fluoride and some foods.

Dental decay begins inside the tooth enamel when minerals are being lost faster than they are being regained.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • more information on the Immediate Effects of food
  • information on the Long-Term Effects of food
  • information on What to Eat

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Sunday, 2 April 2017

Nutrition Tips: How to Eat Healthy

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by Yolanda Eddis

Healthy eating is essential for your overall health. Choosing foods and beverages that provide the right amount of energy and nutrients goes a long way toward maintaining not only a healthy body, but also a healthy mouth. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offer numerous nutrition resources, such as sample recipes, menus and educational tools that will guide you in picking out the right foods and drinks to consume. By knowing how to eat healthy, you can improve your physical and oral health, prevent disease and promote healthy growth and development for children and adolescents.

What Is a Nutritious Diet?

Eating a nutritious diet has many benefits. A well-balanced diet should include foods from the basic food groups and subgroups along with the right oils. Nutrients such as carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins and minerals are a staple of healthy diets, but it's also important to avoid eating too many or too few nutrients.

In an effort to assist consumers to learn how to eat healthy, the U.S. Department of Agriculture developed the MyPlate website. MyPlate illustrates the five food groups, which include fruits, vegetables, grains, proteins and dairy, and provides several examples of each. Oils that come from different plants and fish are also recommended although they don't constitute a food group of their own. The selection of foods from these groups can be fresh, canned, frozen or dried. The site also recommends different ways to balance your caloric intake by increasing nutrients and decreasing the consumption of sugar and sodium in meals and snacks.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • How to Select Healthy Beverages
  • Healthy Habits after Eating and Drinking
  • Healthy Eating Tips
  • Diet and Dental Health

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Friday, 31 March 2017

How Tooth Whitening Works

Learn what the American Dental Association has to say about teeth whitening in their video on 'How Tooth Whitening Works.'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Sunday, 26 March 2017

Diet, Food Choices and Healthy Gums

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by the ADA 

Can food or drink choices help a person have healthier gums?

Japanese researchers studied a group of nearly 950 adults to determine whether consuming dairy products with lactic acid like milk, yogurt and cheese, had a lower risk for gum disease.

Participants' periodontal health was evaluated through two measurements - periodontal pocket depth and clinical attachment loss of gum tissue. Researchers found that participants who consumed 55 grams or more each day of yogurt or lactic acid drinks had significantly lower instance of periodontal disease. They found that consuming milk or cheese was not as beneficial to periodontal health.

Researchers theorize that the probiotic effect of Lactobacillus bacteria could be related to healthier gums. Another Japanese study showed that adults who drank green tea might also lead to healthier gums, because its antioxidants have anti - inflammatory properties.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Friday, 24 March 2017

Pregnancy and Newborn Oral Health

Learn what the American Dental Association has to say about 'Pregnancy and Newborn Oral Health.'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Friday, 17 March 2017

Get Wise About Wisdom Teeth

Learn what the American Dental Association has to say about wisdom teeth in their video titled 'Get Wise About Wisdom Teeth.'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Tuesday, 7 March 2017

Travel Tips for Your Teeth: Emergencies

In Case of Emergency...
Have your dentist’s contact info handy in your cell phone or keep a business card in your wallet. “If you think you need to talk to somebody, you probably do,” Dr. Messina says. In fact, more dental emergencies can be resolved over the phone than you might think (especially if you keep up regular visits). “As a patient, it’s hard to know the difference between something that needs to be treated right away and something that can wait until you get home,” he says. “That’s what we are here for.”

In Case of Emergency Overseas...
If you are out of the country and absolutely in need of a dentist, Dr. Messina recommends getting in touch with the local consulate or U.S. embassy. “While talking to the concierge at the hotel is OK, ask the consulate and their employees for a recommendation,” he says. “It’s an independent recommendation and not someone who may be driving business because of a contract or to a relative.”

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Friday, 3 March 2017

Custom Mouth-guards

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about custom mouth-guards.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Tuesday, 28 February 2017

Travel Tips for Your Teeth: Toothbrush

Forget Your Toothbrush?
Sunscreen? Check. Phone charger? Check. Toothbrush? Oops. If you find yourself temporarily without a toothbrush, Dr. Messina says you can rinse vigorously with water to wash away some of that cavity-causing bacteria. You could also put some toothpaste on a clean washcloth or your clean finger in a pinch. When you finally get to the nearest drugstore, look for a toothbrush with the ADA Seal of Acceptance. If there aren’t any Seal products, buy the softest brush you can find.

Proper Toothbrush Transport
Letting your toothbrush air dry is how you keep your toothbrush clean at home, but that’s not always possible on vacation. What’s a traveling toothbrush to do? “I’m a big fan of resealable plastic bags. Keeping your toothbrush clean and out of contact with other things is more important that making sure it’s dry on vacation,” Dr. Messina says. “A bag keeps your toothbrush separate from everything else in your luggage. When you get there, pop it open and let your brush air dry.”

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Friday, 24 February 2017

Smile, It's Important

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about smiling and healthy teeth.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Tuesday, 21 February 2017

Travel Tips for Your Teeth

Pack an ADA-Accepted Pack of Gum 
Chewing sugarless gum can help relieve ear pressure during a flight ñ and help keep cavities at bay on vacay. Research shows that chewing sugarless gum for 20 minutes after a meal can help prevent cavities. That’s because it gets saliva flowing, which helps wash away cavity-causing bacteria. Sugarless gum with the ADA Seal is guaranteed to do the trick.

When In Doubt, Brush with Bottled Water 
If you are in a country where the water supply is compromised - or you’re on a wilderness adventure but aren’t sure how clean the stream is - always use bottled water to brush. “Don’t use the local water to brush your teeth,” Dr. Messina says. What happens if you accidentally get local water on your toothbrush? “Get a new one if you can,” he says. “If that isn’t possible, rinse your brush well with bottled water to reduce the risk of getting sick.”

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Friday, 17 February 2017

Aging & Your Oral Health

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about aging and your oral health.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Thursday, 9 February 2017

February is National Children’s Dental Health Month

Because developing good habits at an early age and scheduling regular dental visits helps children get a good start on a lifetime of healthy teeth and gums, the American Dental Association sponsors National Children’s Dental Health Month each February.

Now in its 63rd year, this month-long national health observance brings together thousands of dedicated dental professionals, health care providers and others to promote the benefits of good oral health to children and adults, caregivers, teachers and many others.

Parents and teachers can help kids celebrate and learn more about the importance of a healthy smile. The ADA offers free downloadable information, kid-friendly oral health worksheets and games on MouthHealthy.org, the ADA’s consumer website. Click on the For Kids tab on the left side of the page for a variety of age-appropriate activities, games and videos and presentations. There are also teaching guides that adults can use at home, in the classroom or in other community-based settings.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Thursday, 2 February 2017

February is National Pet Dental Health Month

Don't turn your nose to Fido's or Fluffy's bad breath! That odor might signify a serious health risk, with the potential to damage not only your pet's teeth and gums but its internal organs as well.

To address the significance of oral health care for pets, the AVMA sponsors National Pet Dental Health Month every February. Click on the links below to learn more about  how you can improve the dental (and overall) health of your pets. 

Test Yourself
How much do you know about your pet's dental health? Take our quiz to find out!

Watch
Dr. Sheldon Rubin gives easy, step-by-step instructions on how to teach a dog or cat to accept a daily tooth brushing. He also describes healthy treats, and explains the true risks of periodontal disease in pets. 

Periodontal disease is the most common clinical condition in cats and dogs even though it's completely preventable. Dr. Cindy Charlier explains what periodontal disease is and how we can prevent our pets from getting it.

To read the entire article visit AVMA.org.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Tuesday, 31 January 2017

Oral Health for Senior Citizens

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about dental care for senior citizens.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Thursday, 26 January 2017

Brushing Your Kid's Teeth

It’s never too early to get children in the habit of good oral care. Of course, it’s up to parents to take the “first steps.” Finding new ways to model good dental habits and practice them with your kids is key. The sooner kids begin to take charge of their own teeth, the happier and healthier they (and you) will be. And the payoffs over a lifetime are immeasurable.

Don’t Worry-You’re Not Alone 
If you think it’s a challenge to teach your kids good oral care, you’re in good company. Tooth decay is one of the most common childhood diseases. And studies show that almost 50% of kids between six and eight have had at least one cavity.1 These are just a couple of reasons why it’s so important to help kids understand right from the start that proper dental habits are a smart idea.

To read the entire article visit OralB.com.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Tuesday, 24 January 2017

Dental Plans

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about dental plans.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Tuesday, 17 January 2017

Great American Smokeout

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about about quitting smoking.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Sunday, 8 January 2017

What is a Cavity and What Causes Tooth Decay?

What to Know About Cavities and Tooth Decay

While cavities are very common dental problems in both children and adults, they can be prevented. Find out what you need to know to stay ahead of cavities. 

What Exactly Is a Cavity? 
It’s actually pretty simple. Decay (or softening of enamel) happens over time and the result is a cavity-a defect left in the tooth. Teeth are covered with a hard protective top layer called enamel. But once the enamel is weakened by acids produced by bacteria, a pit or cavity is formed in or on the tooth surface. 

What Causes Cavities and Tooth Decay?
While it’s ultimately acid-producing bacteria that leads to cavity formation, the most common cause of bacterial growth is inadequate daily brushing and flossing. Certain foods (carbs) and sugary drinks contribute to cavity formation-bacteria metabolize these carbohydrates and sugars and produce cavity-forming acids. 

To read the entire article visit OralB.com.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Sunday, 1 January 2017

The Difference Between Plaque and Tartar

Lots of people ask their dental professional if there’s a difference between plaque and tartar-and it’s a great question. Both plaque and tartar buildup are common dental problems. Significant plaque buildup can result in tooth decay and gum disease. Tartar is calcified plaque. Arming yourself with the facts can help you be smarter about how you care for your teeth. 

The Facts About Plaque
Plaque is sticky, colorless film containing bacteria that builds up naturally on tooth surfaces and especially along the gum line within four to 12 hours after brushing. Sugars in food and drinks can combine with plaque bacteria to release acids. These acids attack tooth enamel and break it down, which can then create cavities. Plaque bacteria can also contribute to gum disease, like gingivitis. Regular brushing and flossing are your most effective tools in the fight against plaque. If it’s not removed daily, plaque eventually accumulates and hardens into tartar.  

To read the entire article visit OralB.com.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com