Sunday, 30 April 2017

Natural Teeth Whitening: Fact vs. Fiction

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

When it comes to teeth whitening, you may see many different methods featured online and in magazines-from oil pulling to charcoal, and even turmeric. It's no surprise that DIY whitening is top of mind, either. When the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry asked people what they’d most like to improve their smile, the most common response was whiter teeth. 
Healthy smiles come in many shades, though it's tempting to think ingredients in our own kitchens could hold the key to a brighter smile. Still, just because a method is natural doesn’t mean it’s healthy. In fact, DIY whitening can do more harm than good to your teeth. Here’s how:  

Fruits











Fiction:
The approach maintains you can make your teeth whiter and brighter household staples that are naturally acidic (like lemons, oranges, apple cider vinegar), contain digestive enzymes (such as pineapple or mango) and something that is abrasive (like baking soda).
Fact: 
When eaten as usual, fruit is a great choice. However, fruit and vinegar contain acid, and you put your pearly whites at risk when you prolong their contact with your teeth or use them to scrub your teeth because acid can wear away your enamel. Enamel is the thin outer coating of your teeth that protects you from tooth sensitivity and cavities. 

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article reveals fact vs. fiction for the following:

  • Scrubs
  • Spices and Oils
  • Still Interested in Whitening?

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Monday, 24 April 2017

April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month


April is Oral Cancer Awareness Month
Oral cancer can be fatal. But if detected early, it has a fantastic cure rate.
Get your painless oral cancer screening today! Ask your dentist for an oral cancer screening.
It could save your life


Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'Does Your Dentist Know If You Lie About Brushing and Flossing?'

'Does Your Dentist Know If You Lie About Brushing and Flossing? '


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Sunday, 23 April 2017

8 Non-Dairy, Calcium-Rich Foods for Your Teeth

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org 

Caring for your teeth means more than brushing and cleaning between them every day. It also means paying attention to the foods you eat. 

One of the most important nutrients for healthy teeth is calcium. Calcium strengthens the hard outer shell of your tooth called enamel, which is your teeth’s defense against erosion and cavities. To protect your teeth and get the 1,000-2,000 mg daily recommended amount of calcium, many people turn to dairy products like milk, cheese and yogurt. 

If you’re lactose intolerant or need to limit dairy, there are a number of foods that can still give you the calcium you need. Calcium is found naturally in some foods, while others - such as juice, tofu and even waffles - are now fortified with added calcium. 

Here are some non-dairy options from the USDA Food Composition Database to help keep your body and smile strong.

Orange Juice with Added Calcium











Oranges naturally have a bit of calcium, but many varieties of orange juice (already a top source of vitamin C) now come fortified with calcium. For example, frozen orange juice from concentrate with added calcium contains 1514 mg of calcium per cup. That's your daily recommendation in just one glass! Juice, however, can be high in sugar, so drink it in moderation.  If your child drinks juice, make sure to serve the recommended, age-appropriate limits.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article highlights 7 over non-dairy, calcium-rich foods that are good for your teeth:

  • Whey Powder
  • Tofu with Added Calcium
  • Canned Fish
  • Beans
  • Almonds
  • Leafy Green Vegetables
  • Soymilk

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Monday, 17 April 2017

Your Dentist and Hygienist are your First Line of Defense


Your Dentist and Hygienist are your First Line of Defense
Who else ever examines the inside of your mouth this closely?
Oral cancer can be fatal. But if detected early the cure rate is astounding.
Ask your dentist for a painless oral cancer screening today.
It could save your life.


Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com

Ask the Dentist by the ADA: 'Should I Pull Out My Child’s Loose Tooth?'

The American Dental Association has created informative videos called Ask the Dentist. Here is their video on: 'Should I Pull Out My Childís Loose Tooth?'


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Monday, 10 April 2017

Oral Cancer Screening


Oral cancer is a killer. Thousands die from it every year.
Don’t be one of them.
Ask your dentist for a painless oral cancer screening today!
It could save your life.


Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com

Sunday, 9 April 2017

Mouth-Healthy Eating

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was Reviewed by the Faculty of Columbia University College of Dental Medicine

If you want to prevent cavities, how often you eat can be just as important as what you eat. That's because food affects your teeth and mouth long after you swallow. Eating cookies with dinner will do less harm to your teeth than eating them as a separate snack. Of course, overall poor nutrition can contribute to periodontal (gum) disease. It also can have other long-term effects on your mouth. Learning how food affects your oral health is the first step toward mouth-healthy eating.

Immediate Effects of Food

Changes begin in your mouth the minute you start to eat certain foods. Bacteria in your mouth make acids. The acids start the process that can lead to cavities.

How does this happen?
All carbohydrate foods eventually break down into simple sugars: glucose, fructose, maltose and lactose. Fermentable carbohydrates break down in the mouth. Other foods don't break down until they move further down the digestive tract.

Fermentable carbohydrates work with bacteria to form acids that begin the decay process and eventually destroy teeth. They include the obvious sugary foods, such as cookies, cakes, soft drinks and candy. But they also include less obvious foods, such as bread, crackers, bananas and breakfast cereals.

Certain bacteria on your teeth use the sugars from these foods and produce acids. The acids dissolve minerals inside the tooth enamel. The process is called demineralization. Teeth also can regain minerals. This natural process is called remineralization. Saliva helps minerals to build back up in teeth. So do fluoride and some foods.

Dental decay begins inside the tooth enamel when minerals are being lost faster than they are being regained.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • more information on the Immediate Effects of food
  • information on the Long-Term Effects of food
  • information on What to Eat

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com 

Sunday, 2 April 2017

Nutrition Tips: How to Eat Healthy

Below is an excerpt from an article found on Colgate.com that was written by Yolanda Eddis

Healthy eating is essential for your overall health. Choosing foods and beverages that provide the right amount of energy and nutrients goes a long way toward maintaining not only a healthy body, but also a healthy mouth. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offer numerous nutrition resources, such as sample recipes, menus and educational tools that will guide you in picking out the right foods and drinks to consume. By knowing how to eat healthy, you can improve your physical and oral health, prevent disease and promote healthy growth and development for children and adolescents.

What Is a Nutritious Diet?

Eating a nutritious diet has many benefits. A well-balanced diet should include foods from the basic food groups and subgroups along with the right oils. Nutrients such as carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins and minerals are a staple of healthy diets, but it's also important to avoid eating too many or too few nutrients.

In an effort to assist consumers to learn how to eat healthy, the U.S. Department of Agriculture developed the MyPlate website. MyPlate illustrates the five food groups, which include fruits, vegetables, grains, proteins and dairy, and provides several examples of each. Oils that come from different plants and fish are also recommended although they don't constitute a food group of their own. The selection of foods from these groups can be fresh, canned, frozen or dried. The site also recommends different ways to balance your caloric intake by increasing nutrients and decreasing the consumption of sugar and sodium in meals and snacks.

To read the entire article visit Colgate.com.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • How to Select Healthy Beverages
  • Healthy Habits after Eating and Drinking
  • Healthy Eating Tips
  • Diet and Dental Health

Dentist Plymouth MI
Douglas A. Callow, DDS
9357 General Drive, Suite 112
Plymouth, MI 48170
Phone: (734) 455-2890
Website: www.CallowDDS.com